Loughgall (@1.57) vs H & W Welders (@4.1)
05-10-2019

Our Prediction:

Loughgall will win

Loughgall – H & W Welders Match Prediction | 05-10-2019 10:00

Three local RUC officers worked at the station, which was only open part-time, from 9 AM to 11 AM, and from 5 PM to 7 PM daily. On the day of the attack, two RUC Headquarters Mobile Support Unit (HMSU) officers were placed in the station to accompany the local RUC officer who was to carry on the normal running of the station.[4][1] The HMSU was the RUC's equivalent of the SAS.

It thinks it can defeat them. Thousands of people attended their funerals, the biggest republican funerals in Northern Ireland since those of the IRA hunger strikers of 1981.[30]Gerry Adams, in his graveside oration, gave a speech stating the British Government understood that it could buy off the government of the Republic of Ireland, which he described as the "shoneen clan" (that is, Anglophile), but added "it does not understand the Jim Lynaghs, the Pdraig McKearneys or the Samus McElwaines. The IRA members killed in the ambush became known as the "Loughgall Martyrs" among IRA supporters.[29] The men's relatives considered their deaths to be part of a deliberate shoot-to-kill policy by the security forces.

Two uninvolved civilians travelling in a car that happened to drive into the scene of the ambush while it was underway were also fired upon by the British forces.

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SAS operations against the IRA also continued. The East Tyrone Brigade continued to be active until the last Provisional IRA ceasefire ten years later.

They were also questioned about the 1974 Dublin and Monaghan bombings,[11] and their weapons were checked in relation to forensic evidence from the murders in question.[13] Both protesters and media camped outside Dundalk station. Sir Arthur Galsworthy, then British ambassador to the Republic of Ireland, stressed his concern about the finding of a shotgun and a dagger among the weapons confiscated by the Garda, and the fact that most of the soldiers were in plain clothes, and that the two groups had given different accounts of their purposes of presence within the Republic of Ireland. The British Army Minister, Bob Brown, apologised to the Irish Government, saying the incursion over the border had been a mistake.[8] The British Government, embarrassed by the situation,[12] gave top priority to the immediate release of the soldiers. When it became clear that a trial was unavoidable, the British Government hardened its position, with a member of the Foreign Office proposing economic sanctions against the Republic, and even mooting the creation of a "buffer zone" along the border, which would have created "a no-man's land in which the terrorist could do what they would". The arrest and detention of eight British Army soldiers put Irish Taoiseach Liam Cosgrave and his coalition government in a dilemma; if he released them without charge he was giving a green light for further British military incursions into the Republic, but if he permitted them to be put on trial and they were convicted, diplomatic relations with Britain would be at risk.[8] A report published by Mr Justice Henry Barron in 2006 revealed that the soldiers were questioned whilst in Garda custody about the three murders, especially that of Seamus Ludlow that had been recently committed in the area. The detainees were subsequently moved under heavy armed escort to Dublin, where they were charged by the Special Criminal Court with possession of firearms with intent to endanger life, and for carrying firearms without a certificate.[8] The charges carried a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.[11] The 8 soldiers were released on bail after the British embassy paid 40,000 and a helicopter flew them out of the state. There were concerns that the station could be attacked by a mob or the IRA at any moment seeking to get at the prisoners.

The Volunteers killed at Loughgall were Declan Arthurs (21), Tony Gormley (24), Eugene Kelly (25), Pdraig McKearney (32), Jim Lynagh (31), Gerard O'Callaghan (28), Seamus Donnelly (19) and unit commander Patrick Joseph Kelly (30). This was the IRA's greatest loss of life in a single incident since the days of the Anglo-Irish War (19191922). On 8 May 1987, at least eight members of the brigade launched another attack on the unmanned Loughgall RUC base. However, as their attack was underway, the IRA unit was ambushed by a Special Air Service (SAS) unit. The SAS shot dead eight IRA members and a civilian who had accidentally driven into the ambush. Six IRA members from a supporting unit managed to escape. The IRA unit used the same tactics as it had done in The Birches attack.[10][11] It destroyed a substantial part of the base with a 200lb bomb and raked the building with gunfire.

According to journalist Ed Moloney, Michael "Pete" Ryan (himself killed with two other PIRA volunteers on 3 June 1991), an alleged top Brigade member, was the commander of the IRA flying column that launched the attack on Derryard checkpoint in Fermanagh on 13 December 1989.

DUP MP Ian Paisley: Two bidders vying to buy Wrightbus

The unidentified men were unwilling to leave the car until Irish Army soldiers came out of the bushes and pointed Heckler & Koch HK33 rifles at them in support of the Garda.[8] The two men, who wore plain clothes, were Fijian-born trooper Ilisoni Ligari and trooper John Lawson, both soldiers in the SAS. After the kidnapping and murder of Seamus Ludlow near Dundalk, the Republic's security forces stepped up their presence along the border.[8] A checkpoint was set up by the Garda and the Irish Army on Flagstaff Road[9] in the townland of Cornamucklagh, some 700 metres inside County Louth in the Republic.[10]At 10:40 pm, the Garda stopped a Triumph 2000 car coming from the north with two men inside.[10] The driver obeyed the signal to stop, but when questioned by the policemen about their destination, they avoided a straight answer. They were asked to step out of the vehicle after one Garda noticed that the passenger had what seemed to be a gun hidden under a map.

Lynagh's strategy was to start off with one area which the British military did not control, preferably a republican stronghold such as east Tyrone. The first phase of Lynagh's plan to drive out the British security forces from east Tyrone involved destroying isolated rural police stations and then intimidating or killing any building contractors who were employed to rebuild them.[5] Lynagh's plans met strong criticism from senior brigade member Kevin McKenna, who regarded the strategy as "too impractical, too ambitious, and not sustainable" per journalist Ed Moloney. The South Armagh area was considered to be a liberated zone already, since British troops and the RUC could not use the roads there for fear of roadside bombs and long-range harassing fire. In the 1980s, the IRA in East Tyrone and other areas close to the border, such as South Armagh, were following a Maoist military theory[3] devised for Ireland by Jim Lynagh, a high-profile member of the IRA in East Tyrone (but a native of County Monaghan).[4] The theory involved creating "no-go zones" that the British Army and Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) did not control and gradually expanding them. Thus it was from there that the IRA East Tyrone Brigade attacks were launched, with most of them occurring in east Tyrone in areas close to south Armagh, which offered good escape routes.

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The shotgun drew the attention of the Garda since the same type of weapon was used in three recent murders in the area. If the roles were reversed we would let you go back. We are all doing the one bloody job", but he eventually ordered his men to surrender their weapons after Irish Army soldiers surrounded both cars and aimed rifles at them.[10] The Garda unit, commanded by Sergeant Pat McLoughlin, radioed his superiors for instructions on how to deal with the men now in custody. Rees and Nicholson were still wearing British Army uniforms. When the soldiers manning the surveillance post failed to meet Ligari and Lawson, they radioed their base at Bessbrook Mill. The Omeath Garda station was ordered to keep the men in custody until a decision was taken at a Governmental level in Dublin. The second cara Vauxhall Victor with Burchell and Rhodeswas stopped shortly after. Initially, an IRA ambush was suspected. Four plain-clothes SAS soldierstroopers Nial McClean, Vincent Thompson, Nigel Burchell and Carsten Rhodeswere sent to search for their missing comrades in two cars, picking up the two men from the observation post in the process.[10] The team was carrying another three Sterling submachine-guns, a Remington pump-action shotgun and 222 rounds of ammunition.[12] The first vehicle a Hillman Avenger carrying Thompson, McClean, Rees and Nicholson - drove up to the Garda checkpoint at 2:05 am. Sergeant Rees tried to explain the situation to the Garda: "Let us go back.

IRA man tells the inside story of the Loughgall attack and the SAS ambush

At about the same time, the unit's commander James Lynagh was spotted in the town, suggesting the van might be used in the attack.[16] The digger (a backhoe loader) was taken from a farm at Lislasly Road, about two miles west of Loughgall. At the same time, another team would arrive in a van and open fire on the base,[3] with the aim of killing the three RUC officers as they came off duty.[18] Both teams would then leave the area in the van.[3] To avoid security checkpoints, the bomb was ferried by boat across Lough Neagh, from Ardboe to Maghery.[19] The van and digger that would be used were hijacked in the hours leading up to the attack.[3] The van, a blue Toyota HiAce, was stolen by masked men from a business in Dungannon. Two IRA members stayed at the farm to stop the owners raising the alarm. One team was to drive a digger with a bomb in its bucket through the base's perimeter fence and light the fuse. The IRA's attack involved two teams. Declan Arthurs drove the digger, while two others drove ahead of him in a scout car.

Below you will find a lot of statistics that make it easier Predict the result for a match between both teams. 9 matches ended in a draw. In 5 (100.00%) matches played away was total goals (team and opponent) Over 1.5 goals. On average in direct matches both teams scored a 3.14 goals per Match.Larne in actual season average scored 2.13 goals per match. Loughgall won 10 matches. In 5 (100.00%) matches played away team was total goals (team and opponent) Over 2.5 goals. Below the text is a list of the direct games. In 2 (66.67%) matches played at home was total goals (team and opponent) Over 1.5 goals. In 2 (66.67%) matches in season 2019 played at home was total goals (team and opponent) Over 2.5 goals. Teams Larne Loughgall played so far 28 matches.Larne won 9 direct matches. Loughgall average scored 2.20 goals per match in season 2019.

An Phoblacht claimed the IRA men thwarted an ambush and at least two SAS members were killed.[31] A second shooting took place in the village of Pomeroy on 28 June, this time against British regular troops. On 24 March 1990, there was a gun battle between an IRA unit and undercover British forces at the village of Cappagh, County Tyrone, in which IRA members fired at a civilian-type car driven by security forces, according to Archie Hamilton, then Secretary of State for Defence.[30] Hamilton stated that there were no security or civilian casualties. One soldier was seriously wounded.[32] In October 1990, two IRA volunteers from the brigade (Dessie Grew and Martin McCaughey) were shot dead near Loughgall by SAS undercover members while allegedly collecting two rifles from an IRA arms dump.